It’s not.

But it does have some advantages which are worth considering when picking your crowd funding platform. But you should still pick Kickstarter. Really.

Flexible goals

The biggest advantage of using Indiegogo is the ability to have a flexible goal. This means that you can setup your project to collect money and you’ll receive the pledges even if you do not reach your pre-defined goal. If you’re making a product that you already hold stock for or that does not have an minimum order quantity with your supplier, this can be a very useful way of shifting products without having to run your own full eCommerce store.

Free advertising

To encourage brands to run their crowd funding campaign on Indiegogo rather than any of their competitors, Indiegogo sometimes reach out to campaigns that are about to launch on other platforms and offer incentives to switch to Indiegogo. They offered me a featured position on their website and a feature in their newsletter, for example. I was too far down the line to switch, but it’s worth reaching out to them in advance and asking if they would be willing to do something similar for you. Being featured on Indiegogo will probably bring you more traffic than sitting at the bottom of your category on Kickstarter, so it depends how confident you are in your product and your ability to market it.

Taking more orders after a Kickstarter

The one Indiegogo feature that I have used and found helpful is their “In demand” service. Once you have completed a successful Kickstarter campaign you can setup an In Demand page on Indiegogo to take additional pre-orders while you produce your product, then point to it from your Kickstarter page. You can set a flexible goal on your Indiegogo In Demand page and receive pledges each week as they come in. This is a useful way to continue to makes sales in the quiet period between the end of a Kickstarter and the shipping period.